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25mph+ running?

Discussion in 'Heritage Railways & Centres in the UK' started by Autotank, May 1, 2009.

  1. KentYeti

    KentYeti Guest

    I'll be ever so fussy about which locos I travel behind, (I haven't grown up!). But I'll keep a watch out for what locos get used, so thank you for alerting me to those trains. One thing I am gonna get up North for, if it happens, is a faster moving Schools class working some trains ex the NYM that someone on the Forum mentioned recently. I think the limit for this is 45 mph, much better than 25 mph, but not up to what I no doubt missed by not timing, (at the age of 12), the only two Schools runs I have had so far!
     
  2. ernestgew

    ernestgew Member

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    No sorry I should have said it, it was with diesels and modern stuff for tests #-o
     
  3. KentYeti

    KentYeti Guest

    Oh well. The thought of it was good though!
     
  4. tfftfftff86

    tfftfftff86 Member

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    I liked the video of the 30777 fast run, Jamie, we don't see that as often as we do Tornado at speed. As you seem quite familiar with the GCR, can you tell us the recommended speed for the TPO to pass the pick-up/drop off? It's always exciting to watch it blast through Quorn station.
     
  5. olly5764

    olly5764 Well-Known Member

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    You would be surprised as to just how well a good crew can pull back time even at 25 MPH. It would not be the first time that I have stopped at Stations allong the Valley for just a few seconds, then once clear of the 10 MPH limit that all of our stations have, got up to line speed very briskly.
     
  6. ernestgew

    ernestgew Member

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    Haha yes, thats a common phrase "I don't go above line speed, I just get up to it and stop from it very quickly". Always sounds better when thats happening! =D>
     
  7. Forevagrey

    Forevagrey New Member

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    I heard from one of there drivers its 50+ but i stand to be corrected
     
  8. olly5764

    olly5764 Well-Known Member

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    Often quoted but also often true! Had some one once come up to the footplate and tell me and my driver what speed he had clocked us at. Not only was his idea of the speed, well over double what we were actually doing, but with that load, on that gradient, with that loco, was also a physical impossibility.
     
  9. Christopher125

    Christopher125 Part of the furniture

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  10. basher

    basher Member

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    Thats a really well put together, well thought out bit of film that. Really entertaining!

    Any idea who filmed/edited it? They deserve more credit! =D>

    Cracking bit of footage.
     
  11. Jamie C. Steel

    Jamie C. Steel Member

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    The maximum speed on TPO runs is 35mph between the distant on the up at Quorn, up to and after the drop-off, at which point speed must be reduced down to the standard 25mph.
     
  12. tfftfftff86

    tfftfftff86 Member

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    Thanks Jamie. It always seems faster when you're standing on the platform three yards from the line.
     
  13. Martin Perry

    Martin Perry Nat Pres stalwart Staff Member Moderator

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    Are all the TPO vehicles vac braked?
     
  14. pmh_74

    pmh_74 Well-Known Member

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    Are all the TPO vehicles vac braked?[/quote:1hwyp4vy]
    Yes. 80301 is vac-only, the other three arrived as air-only but have had vacuum gear re-instated. RVP plan to dual-brake 80301 in due course making the set fully dual braked, though of course the GCR doesn't have any air-braked steam engines so it will continue to use vacuum anyway, at least with steam.

    Phil
     
  15. bhallett

    bhallett Well-Known Member

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    TPO operating speeds.

    Having operated TPOs at all the three current TPO sites and all four apparatus points and having good access to staff who operated the equipment in its heyday the following can be said about the speed required to exchange the pouches.

    The system was designed to operate at all operational speeds, you have to remember that the TPO would still need to exchange mail when speed restrictions were in force. I have been involved in exchanging pouches (as a trial) at half walking pace, it worked but minor damage was done to the pouch being dropped from the coach, due to it being dragged up the strop before being released from the traductor arm. At a similar speed one of the lineside standards was damaged at Didcot, I understand (but may be wrong) that a flaw in the standard was later discovered. At 5-10 MPH the exchange worked fine. At very high speeds, in excess of 60 MPH, the system still worked fine but the pouches would fly into the coach and had a tendancy to take out the lighting / heating. Those pouches weigh upto 27 Kg / 60 lb and at speed can do some damage.

    Having operated TPOs for over 10 years now and having seen various speeds and the damage it can do to the pouches, I would say that the optimal speed to prolong the life of the pouches is 20 - 40 MPH.
     
  16. pmh_74

    pmh_74 Well-Known Member

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    I was told by someone in RVP that the original GPO rules specified a minimum of 35mph - any slower, the train would stop to set down/pick up mail bags. The thinking is that at slower speeds the bags are 'dragged' rather than 'snatched' and that this leads to wear/damage to the exchange equipment... presumably with potential longer-term consequences.

    Note that this is only my understanding based on conversations down the pub, and I don't proclaim to have all of the facts. ;-)
     
  17. bhallett

    bhallett Well-Known Member

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