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Isle Of Man Steam Railway

Discussion in 'Narrow Gauge Railways' started by David Bigcheeseplant, Jun 11, 2016.

  1. marshall5

    marshall5 Well-Known Member

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    Yes, No.10's overhaul will be, largely, as extensive as No.11's with one major exception. No.10's cylinders were replaced in 1993 and they will probably not need to be replaced this time.
    Ray.
     
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  2. marshall5

    marshall5 Well-Known Member

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    Duplicate post
     
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2022
  3. robpalmer

    robpalmer New Member

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    In 1993 No.10 had the holly green livery with red lining either side of the black. I always understood that this was the correct version as used up to 1946 (although I think that the change to Indian red was on different dates for different locos). This seems to be backed up by photos of the period where the red line is difficult to see as red did not respond well to photo emulsions of the time. In much earlier times the lines were much brighter but then the positioning of the lining was different. Now a white line outside the black is used on No. 13, which period is this supposed to represent?
    https://flic.kr/p/2myEQvL
     
  4. 30854

    30854 Resident of Nat Pres

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    I was on the point of making some glib comment, but looking at the image of No.10 (which, having just checked, looks about identical to sectioned exhibit Pender's livery at MOSI), I have to agree with @robpalmer that the difference is very visible.

    Whether either version is an entirely accurate representation of the original IMR livery, or some later variation, is one for folks far better versed in IMR lore than me. From what I've seen, away from the big UK mainline companies, details such as lining tended to be dictated as much by the state of a line's finances as much as any set "policy".
     
  5. Chrisw77

    Chrisw77 New Member

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    While no3 Pender has been mentioned, i was wondering if the MOSI where to dispose of pender for any reason would she return to the IMR, wonder if there was any agreement in this case
     
  6. Chrisw77

    Chrisw77 New Member

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    thanks for info Ray, so 10’will be almost like new on her eventual return
     
  7. 30854

    30854 Resident of Nat Pres

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    Given the loco is within a stone's throw of it's birthplace, why would they? MOSI are as proud of being the home of Beyer Peacock as the Isle of Man are of being home to so many of it's fine locos. So far as demonstrating the 'guts' of a steam loco goes, little Pender has to be a lot easier to study close up for visitors than the enormous 35029 at York.

    AIUI, when shipped to Manc, it was pretty much only the rust holding No.3 together!

    Would display at MOSI have been my preferred option? I'd have liked to have seen a condition of sale providing for some publicity (even just a headboard) for the IMR .... I believe the line's 'powers that were' at the time missed a trick there, but at least the little loco's future is at least assured. It could all too easily have gone the way of No.2.
     
  8. meeee

    meeee Member

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    There is currently a major redevelopment of the power hall going on at MoSI. Hopefully it will breathe some life back into this once great gallery, but who knows. Sadly the achievements of various people to improve the representation of railways at the museum were completely undone in recent years.

    Tim
     
  9. Chrisw77

    Chrisw77 New Member

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    Very true, reason I mentioned as there was a whisper some time ago that the museum may close, so that’s why I asked, so I wondered if they would return her to the island in that situation. I have been to visit Pender many years ago amd it is interesting to see the insides though not a fan of it being sectioned at all, but it is better that it’s future is safeguarded amd not just a memory like no2, it is great that a line like the IMR has all but one of their locos survive after all this time
     
  10. marshall5

    marshall5 Well-Known Member

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    Sorry to disagree Howard but I think that both of those statements are a bit of an exaggeration. For several years before No.3 went to MOSI in 1979 it was on daily display with other o.o.u. locos in Douglas station, was reasonably well cared for and in no worse condition than any of the others as I hope the photo (taken in 1974) shows. No.3 is 2nd in the line up. I'm certain that No.3 was never in any danger of scrapping and the circumstances of No.2's dismantling in 1951 were very different.
    Cheers,
    Ray.
    06-74-15 IMR stord locos Douglas  9.74.jpg
     
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  11. Chrisw77

    Chrisw77 New Member

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    Ray, am I correct in thinking that the reasoning for 2 & 7 being withdrawn and dismantled were due to damage from earlier accidents?
     
  12. 30854

    30854 Resident of Nat Pres

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    Lovely photo Ray. As they say "thanks for the memory". :)

    On No.3, OK, maybe I exaggerate, but only for effect (!). I'm certain I remember rust being mentioned .... and a fair amount of it! Perhaps I should add 'paint' (and doubtless some caked on oil and grease) to the list.

    That photo does prompt one question though. Did any of the ironwork from the platform roofs survive? I could imagine today's passengers being no less grateful for some protection from the elements than they were years ago, especially if they've made the effort to dress up in their finery for the dining train. As always, money and priorities, I guess.
     
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  13. marshall5

    marshall5 Well-Known Member

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    It was more to do with the decline in traffic post WW2 and less work for the 'small' engines. Their 'Bradshaw' boilers (distinguished by having a single 'pop' valve on the boiler barrel between the chimney and dome) went on to Nos. 3 & 1 respectively. The wheels and motion etc. went into the pool of spares and even the tanks and cabs survived until the big clear out in 1974/5. No.2's frames survived in the upholstery shop until scrapped after the Gov't takeover in 1978. No.7's frames survive, privately owned, in a field in Suffolk.
    As regards the canopies, they were demolished in 1978 due to their dangerous condition and I don't expect that they will be replaced in my lifetime. Today's passengers have a new atrium type waiting area beyond the buffers in the same location as the white painted structure which can be seen behind the last carriage in the photo below.
    Ray.
    08-78-13  IMR No13 dep. Douglas   8.78 (2).jpg
     
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  14. 30854

    30854 Resident of Nat Pres

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    Weren't No.7's frames moved from Suffolk to "somewhere in the English Midlands" a while back? I do wonder what the long term plans are for No.7 and suspect the only practical use for those tired looking frames will be as somewhere to display the nameplate(s)!

    Re: the 'small' locos (gainful employment of). What sort of levels of goods traffic did the IMR formerly handle and when did that begin drying up? Though I understand the reasons why it never happened, I've always suspected the lack of a rail link to Douglas Harbour was a systemic weakness, albeit one which likely wouldn't have prevented the ultimate triumph of road transport.

    By the by, another 3ft gauge island network, the FCdeMallorca, pensioned off it's original trio of small (Nasmyth Wilson) 4-4-0T locos at around the same time. In another similarity with the IMR, some of the smaller locos were rebuilt in larger guise. Unfortunately, that's where the parallels end, as the entire FCM steam fleet (which included locos bought from the FCdeSoller, when it electrified) was scrapped by the early 1960s
     
  15. 5944

    5944 Resident of Nat Pres

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    Screenshot_20220309-174704~2.png

    Video posted just now on Facebook by IoMSRSA.
     
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  16. marshall5

    marshall5 Well-Known Member

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    Seasonal passenger traffic was always the 'bread & butter' of the IMR and most goods traffic could be handled by 2 or 3 wagons attached to timetabled passenger trains. The main exceptions were periodic livestock or coal specials, the latter being in connection with the arrival of a coal boat in Ramsey. Coal could be trans-shipped directly from ship to rail via the Ramsey Harbour Tramway. As you probably know there had been several proposals for a Douglas Harbour branch but I assume that the amount of traffic didn't justify the expense. I'm sure Boyd has covered this much better than I can do.
    Cheers,
    Ray.
     
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  17. Michael B

    Michael B New Member

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    Lord Ailsa painted the engines a light green - as shown on Mannin at St Johns in 1968. It would look much nicer painted either of the colours now on No 11 or No 13. St Johns Mannin   6.68.jpg
     
  18. 30854

    30854 Resident of Nat Pres

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    ... wot, no kippers (I know there were kipper wagons)? ;)

    One regular traffic I've only ever seen mentioned in relation to the GNRI was bread (handled in small containers), which for some odd reason seemed a widely valued feature of operarations, to the extent that when closure of the Derry Road loomed, the subject featured as large as the coal traffic when closure of the L&B approached.

    On the Isle of Wight, other than trainload cement and coal (loco, domestic and gasworks), goods traffic levels seem to have dropped off a cliff by grouping.
     
  19. Chrisw77

    Chrisw77 New Member

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    I’m hoping for the same livery as no 13, seen as it takes her back to delivery colour, hopefully chimney numerals will be restored to
     
  20. Chrisw77

    Chrisw77 New Member

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    thanks for the info Ray, such a shame no2 slipped through the net in the 70s, I actually bought pics of their cabs and tanks in m wagons from a shop near the ferry terminal, this guy had a model shop and also sold books and photos in the 90s, was a great shop
     

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