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Pre TOPS Diesels

Discussion in 'Photography' started by neildimmer, Aug 2, 2019.

  1. neildimmer

    neildimmer Resident of Nat Pres

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    I
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2021
  2. simon

    simon Resident of Nat Pres

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  3. neildimmer

    neildimmer Resident of Nat Pres

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    Last edited: Jan 13, 2021
  4. oddsocks

    oddsocks Well-Known Member

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    Retired / Dodging a Coffin for as long as I can.
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    No I do not currently volunteer
    Neil. That photo of Hawk looks like it's at Brush works, Loughborough to me. outside what was then the main erecting shop. (Note there's a brand new class 47 on the right.)
     
  5. neildimmer

    neildimmer Resident of Nat Pres

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    I have added some new photos to the collection of Pre TOPS diesels
    This collection features the Class 23 Baby Deltics
    Including this old and new at Kings Cross
    https://tinyurl.com/y3txzvh2
    Full collection starts here with
    D5900 with full yellow end but still in green livery
    https://tinyurl.com/y28p8b3b


    Neil
     
  6. Fred Kerr

    Fred Kerr Resident of Nat Pres Friend

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  7. neildimmer

    neildimmer Resident of Nat Pres

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    I have added a very large collection of Pre TOPS Brush Type 4 (class 47)
    And yes I have permission from throughtheireyes & Barking Bill Wright to use them
    Including this photo of 1st built D1500 (sorry not the best photo but very historical)
    D1500 brand new on trial, note the number under the cab window
    https://tinyurl.com/yygum23q
    Full collection starting with ‘D’ prefix start here
    https://tinyurl.com/y6era2x9
    full collection with just 4 numbers start here
    https://tinyurl.com/y6l827ny
    Neil.
    https://tinyurl.com/yygum23q
     
  8. Fred Kerr

    Fred Kerr Resident of Nat Pres Friend

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  9. neildimmer

    neildimmer Resident of Nat Pres

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    I have added a collection of photos of the E.E. Type 3 (class 37)
    Some of the photos are by Tony Gillett & Bill Wright who have given me permission to use there photos
    Including this 1968 photo by Tony Gillett of
    D68## at Rose Grove 1968 with brake tender
    https://tinyurl.com/ak7kcjyb
    Full collection starts here with
    D6708
    https://tinyurl.com/2mmytvb2

    Neil.
     
  10. neildimmer

    neildimmer Resident of Nat Pres

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    The British Rail Class 22 or "Baby Warship" was a class of diesel-hydraulic locomotives designed for the Western Region of British Railways and built by the North British Locomotive Company. They were very similar in appearance to the Class 21 diesel-electrics. The nickname Baby Warship related to the similarity in appearance (and internal equipment) to the British Rail Class D20/2 or Class 41 Warship Class. The Class 22s were numbered D6300-D6357
    I have added a large collection of over 55 photos of the N.B.L. locos
    Including this collection at a S. Wales scrapyard
    D6317 and others
    https://tinyurl.com/nu50grmn
    Full collection starts here with
    D6300
    https://tinyurl.com/1bgnkpvn

    Neil.
     
  11. neildimmer

    neildimmer Resident of Nat Pres

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    The British Rail Class 15 diesel locomotives, also known as the BTH Type 1, were designed by British Thomson-Houston, and built by the Yorkshire Engine Company and the Clayton Equipment Company, between 1957 and 1961. They were numbered D8200-D8243.
    The Class 15 was ordered by British Railways (BR) shortly after the announcement of the 1955 Modernisation Plan, which led to the procurement of a diverse number of diesel locomotives under the 'pilot scheme'. Shortly following the completion of the first locomotive during 1957, its performance was sufficient to justify multiple follow-on orders, leading to a total fleet of 44 locomotives. In service, the type was relatively unreliable, much of this been traceable to its Paxman 16YHXL power unit. Its fortunes were further impacted by inconsistent policy making. During the late 1960s, it was decided to withdraw the Class 15 in favour of the more numerous and successful British Rail Class 20 locomotive, both types having been developed to satisfy the same Type 1 specification. Their final use was as departmental vehicles, coming to an end in the late 1980s. One example has survived into preservation.

    Some of the photos are by Nigel Kendall & Bill Wright who have given me permission to use there photos

    Including this photo of
    D8217 & D8406 Temple Mills June 1967
    https://tinyurl.com/2p9hqu5t
    Full collection starts here with
    D8200 at Euston c1950
    https://tinyurl.com/4brbwsrz

    Neil.
     
  12. neildimmer

    neildimmer Resident of Nat Pres

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    The British Rail Class 17 (also known as the Clayton Type 1) was a class of 117 Bo-Bo diesel-electric locomotives built 1962–1965 by Clayton Equipment Company and their sub-contractor Beyer, Peacock & Co., on behalf of British Railways (BR).
    During the 1950s and 1960s, BR procured a wide range of Type 1 diesel locomotives, many of which under the Pilot Scheme. However, several officials felt that the single-cabbed arranged used by the majority of Type 1s presented visibility difficulties to drivers in the 'less convenient' direction. Thus, BR approached several manufacturers, seeking a new locomotives that had a centre cab and low bonnets to maximise visibility. Clayton were selected to produce their proposed locomotive as the Class 17. Its low engine covers required the use of a pair of Paxman 6ZHXL six-cylinder horizontal engines, which had been intended for powering railcars; it was a somewhat unorthodox arrangement for the era.
    Production of the Class 17 was undertaken between 1962 and 1965, with those produced being assigned to the north of Britain and the Scottish region. Early on, it was determined that the locomotive was not suited to heavy freight trains, and quickly acquired a reputation for unreliability largely due to its engines, which continued to deliver poor performance even after extensive modifications. The Class 17 proved to be one of the least successful of the Type 1s. Withdrawals took place from the late 1960s to 1971, some locomotives having a working life of less than five years. Several were sold to industrial users, only one example has been preserved.

    I have added 11 new photos to this collection starting here with
    D8503
    https://tinyurl.com/ev360wgj

    Neil.
     
  13. neildimmer

    neildimmer Resident of Nat Pres

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    I have added a new collection of N.B.L. North British Type 2 diesel-electric (class 21)

    Some of the photos are by Bill Wright and are on my site with permission


    The British Rail Class 21 was a type of Type 2 diesel-electric locomotive built by the North British Locomotive Company in Glasgow for British Railways in 1958-1960. They were numbered D6100-D6157. Thirty-eight of the locomotives were withdrawn by August 1968; the rest were rebuilt with bigger engines to become Class 29, although those locos only lasted until 1971
    Under the British Railways Modernisation Plan, a batch of ten 1,000 hp (746 kW) diesel-electric locomotives were ordered from the North British Locomotive Co. for evaluation under BR's dieselisation pilot scheme. At the same time, six externally similar locomotives with hydraulic transmission were ordered for comparison, these becoming Class 22. Repeat orders resulted in a total of 58 of the diesel-electric locomotives being built (numbered D6100–6157). They were delivered between December 1958 and November 1960.
    Operation
    Eastern Region
    The first 38 locomotives entered service in 1958-59 from the Eastern Region depots at Stratford, Hornsey and Ipswich engine shed on commuter services into London, where they were evaluated against rival designs from English Electric, British Railways, Birmingham RC&W and Brush. The type proved chronically unreliable in Eastern Region service - by March 1960 the Hornsey allocation had moved to New England Yard, Peterborough for storage. This came to the attention of the newspapers and the Daily Telegraph reported that brand new diesel locomotives were being hidden and dumped, which caused questions to be asked in Parliament. The D6100s moved north to the Scottish Region in mid-April 1960, ostensibly to be nearer to the NBL works for repairs but allegedly to move them away from the eyes of the national press.
    Scottish Region
    The final 20 locomotives had uprated 1,100 hp (820 kW) engines and were delivered to Kittybrewster depot on the Scottish Region. They were joined on the Scottish Region by the first 38 locos, which were allocated to Glasgow Eastfield depot, close to the North British factory at Springburn where they had been built. They were used widely across the Scottish Region on a range of work, freight, local passenger and express passenger, the latter sometimes in pairs. Common double headers included Oban & Callander workings, Glasgow-Dundee/Aberdeen expresses, and many freights, and the Ballater Royal train was entrusted to two locos with a standby.[citation needed] They were common on the West Highland lines, Great North of Scotland lines and in the works.[clarification needed] Just one original locomotive, D6109, was repainted in BR Blue with headcodes.
    Problems
    They proved to be unreliable in service, and during 1960 the Eastern Region fleet was transferred to Eastfield depot on the Scottish Region for convenience of return to their manufacturer when warranty work was required. However, the North British Locomotive Works closed in 1962, by which time the type's principal shortcomings had become plain. D6100s suffered problems with the coupling between the power unit and the generator. The engines themselves were a MAN design, but which were built under licence by NBL and of inferior quality to the German originals. Engine cooling systems proved to be inadequate, diesel engines leaked and were not constructed to the appropriate tolerances, cylinder heads fractured and lubricating oil escaped into the battery compartments located below the power unit. These flaws were mostly rectified on a rebuilding programme in 1961-62. The positioning of minor components within the locomotive bodyshell meant that small faults could only be rectified on depot or by return to a railway workshop, which resulted in poor daily availability for traffic figures for the type. Engine room fires were common and wrote off several locomotives. However the later batch, with the B series engine, proved more reliable but still suffered problems. Problems with the NBL/MAN engines are detailed in a report prepared at Swindon in September 1962. This related to the Class 22 but similar problems were experienced with the Class 21

    Including this photo probably taken at Hornsea of D6112 & D6110 along with a D5901 baby Deltic
    https://tinyurl.com/2jsrsn3q
    https://tinyurl.com/16dmle6n
    Full collection starts here with E.R. locations
    D6100
    https://tinyurl.com/58v2p4oq
    Scotland
    D6123
    https://tinyurl.com/58nvhxh6

    Neil
     
  14. neildimmer

    neildimmer Resident of Nat Pres

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    British Railways' (BR) Class 42 Warship diesel-hydraulic locomotives were introduced in 1958. It was apparent at that time that the largest centre of expertise on diesel-hydraulic locomotives was in West Germany. The Western Region of British Railways negotiated a licence with German manufacturers to scale down the German Federal Railway's "V200" design to suit the smaller loading gauge of the British network, and to allow British manufacturers to construct the new locomotives. The resultant design bears a close resemblance, both cosmetically and in the engineering employed, to the original V200 design. Warship locomotives were divided into two batches: those built at BR's Swindon works were numbered in the series D800-D832 and D866-D870, had a maximum tractive effort of 52,400 pounds-force (233,000 N) and eventually became British Rail Class 42. 33 others, D833–D865, were constructed by the North British Locomotive Company and became British Rail Class 43. They were allocated to Bristol Bath Road, Plymouth Laira, Newton Abbot and Old Oak Common.
    A lot of the photos are from throughtheireyes, Nigel Kendal & Tony Gillett, who have given permission for me to use them
    This collection of over 165 photos features D800-D832 & D866-D870 Built Swindon 1958-1961
    Including this photo of
    D821 Greyhound with a Blue Pullman set and a Western Swindon works
    https://tinyurl.com/ljkc63fr
    Full collection of the Class 42 Warships starts here with this photo by Nigel Kendall
    D800 Sir Brian Robertson keeps company with 2 Westerns at Swindon works 3/2/63
    https://tinyurl.com/yegkknwd

    Neil.
     
  15. Fred Kerr

    Fred Kerr Resident of Nat Pres Friend

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    Class 37

    5/71 = Harwich - Manchester Boat Train

    22/71 = Leicester CENTRAL

    Class 22

    7/56 = Laira

    13/56 Exeter Central

    33/56 = Starcross ?

    34/56 Exeter St Davids

    Class 15

    4/10 = Stratford Depot

    Class 17

    41/47 = Polmadie
     
  16. Fred Kerr

    Fred Kerr Resident of Nat Pres Friend

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    Class 21

    3/22 = Hornsey

    5/22 = Hornsey (NOT Hornsea)

    8/22 Perth on a Dundee - Glasgow Buchanan St service
     
  17. Fred Kerr

    Fred Kerr Resident of Nat Pres Friend

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    Class 21

    10/22 = Perth on Dundee - Glasgow Buchanan St service

    11/22 = same as 10/22

    13/22 = Glasgow Buchanan St ?

    14/22 = duplicate of 10/22

    15/22 = colour version of 11/22
     
  18. Fred Kerr

    Fred Kerr Resident of Nat Pres Friend

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    Class 42

    13/165 = Tamar Bridge with Penzance - Paddington service

    16/165 = Exeter St Davids

    17/165 = Old Oak Common [duplicates 21/165]

    39/165 = Exeter St Davids

    42/165 = Penzance

    45/165 = Exeter ST DAVIDS

    51/165 = Exeter St Davids

    63/165 = Exeter St Davids

    66/165 = Waterloo arrival of Exeter - Waterloo service

    67/165 = Paddington

    83/165 = St Phillips Marsh (Bristol)
    84/165 = as 83/165

    90/165 = Exeter St Davids

    94/165 = Plymouth North Rd
    95/165 as for 94/165

    99/165 = Swindon Works

    113/165 = Waterloo arrival of Exeter - Waterloo service

    117/165 duplicates 114/165 but with different location ?

    125/165 = Exeter ST Davids
    126/165 = as 125/165

    131/165 =St Phillips Marsh (Bristol)

    153/165 = St Phillips Marsh (Bristol)
     
  19. neildimmer

    neildimmer Resident of Nat Pres

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    The British Rail Class 43 diesel-hydraulic locomotives were built by the North British Locomotive Company (NBL) from 1960–1962. They were numbered D833-D865.
    The NBL-built D800s differed mechanically from the Swindon-built batch: the Swindon locomotives used Maybach engines connected to Mekydro hydraulic transmissions whereas the NBL-built examples used MAN engines and Voith transmissions. NBL had entered into an arrangement with the German company MAN AG in the early 1950s to market MAN's engine designs in the UK: NBL were anxious to enter the diesel locomotive market, especially once it became apparent that British Railways would be seeking large quantities of such locomotives when the "Modernisation Plan" was announced. MAN were equally keen to obtain a slice of the UK market for themselves. The first results of this collaboration were the D600-D604 locomotives which failed to take advantage of the weight-saving potential of light alloy stressed-skin construction allied to hydraulic transmissions.
    In operational service, the NBL locomotives were less reliable than their Swindon-built cousins. Mild steel was used for the exhaust manifolds and these components were prone to fracture. Not only did this result in a loss of exhaust pressure to drive the turbochargers but also the driving cabs rapidly filled with exhaust fumes. The MAN-built engines used in the German DB class V 200 design had nickel-resist steel manifolds and were far less troublesome. The engine design also suffered from being quite highly rated for a design with no active piston cooling and piston ring life expectancy was decreased as a result. One MAN L12V18/21B was sent to the British Internal Combustion Engine Research Association for various tests and potential modifications to improve the deficiencies but nothing ever came of this. Further problems arose because of the conversion from metric to imperial feet and inches when the MAN drawings were received by NBL. It is almost certain that rounding errors in these conversions resulted in poor tolerances and lowered reliability in practice. Despite all this, figures for 1965 show the North British Warships covered a far greater annual mileage than contemporary Type 4's such as the Westerns, Peaks and Brush Type 4.
    Despite being their last year in service, Class 43 locomotives were still hauling long distance passenger trains over the summer of 1971 on services between Paddington and locations in Devon.
    A lot of the photos are from throughtheireyes, Nigel Kendal & Tony Gillett, who have given permission for me to use them
    This collection features D833-D865 Built N.B.L. 1960-1962
    Including this photo by Tony Gillett of steam rescuing diesel
    D842 Royal Oak is rescued at Westbury after failing by 5003 Lulworth Castle 19/6/1962
    https://tinyurl.com/1i9ifii8
    Full collection of 39 photos starts here with
    D835 Pegasus at Truro
    https://tinyurl.com/155rqo0a

    Neil.
     
  20. Fred Kerr

    Fred Kerr Resident of Nat Pres Friend

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    20/39 = St Phillips Marsh (Bristol)

    35/39 = Exeter St Davids ?

    39/39= Teignmouth
     

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