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Tank linings

Discussion in 'Steam Traction' started by 22A, Feb 11, 2010.

  1. 22A

    22A Well-Known Member

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    Now we all know water rusts metal and loco boilers were given wash outs to prevent the build up of scale etc. Were the insides of tenders & tanks treated or coated in a substance to prevent the water rotting the metal from the inside?
    Now the preservation movement is capable of much more than was ever thought, when locos are rebuilt, do preservationists apply anything that was not around in BR days? I was thinking of perhaps a thin fibre glass case inside the existing water tank.
     
  2. RalphW

    RalphW Nat Pres stalwart Staff Member Administrator Friend

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    Having worked in the chemical industry with all sorts of stuff being shipped out in rail tankers. Water though was best carried in epoxy coated tanks, sprayed on after an etch coat to ensure a good bond. Fibre glass tanks were tried for road vehicles but it was found to be too brittle for mobile use but OK for static perposes.
    Lineside water tanks were usually cast iron as this is quite resistant to normal corrosion. I don't think tenders were coated in any way as I remember seeing leaky ones in the late 50's.
     
  3. Steve

    Steve Resident of Nat Pres Friend

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    The Talyllyn certainly lined the saddletanks on their locos with fibreglass back in the 1960's and whilst I was involved it always seemed to be successful. That was a long time ago, mind you! I don't know whether they are still lined that way. We've lined one saddletank similarly at Middleton and that, too has so far been a success. Not the most pleasant thing to do, though!
     
  4. Martin Perry

    Martin Perry Nat Pres stalwart Staff Member Moderator

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    Epoxy would be the way to go I would have thought, the marine industry went for that after they got away from cement washes!
     
  5. Eightpot

    Eightpot Resident of Nat Pres Friend

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    There is/was paint called 'Apexior' that came as two types, one a graphite type material was for hot/wet surfaces (including steam/water surfaces inside boilers. The other, a gloss black was for hot dry and cold wet surfaces. I have used this in the past inside a steam waggon water tank, but it is essential to kill off any steel corrosion before applying. 'Apexior' used to be, maybe still is, made by British Paints Ltd. The two varieties were No. 1 and No.3, but can't recall now which was which.

    I feel that unless any steel corrosion is halted, the application of anything else on it is a waste of time.
     
  6. streuth

    streuth New Member

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    I guess the problem with epoxy, is that it will eventually rot, even if it's from the outside.
    When it does, you then have the problem of getting rid of the epoxy to effect welded repairs.

    If anything, I'd suggest a nitrile or neoprene fitted bag. Something similar to racing car fuel tanks, or as they call them fuel cell bladders.

    These are nothing to do with electrical fuel cells.

    AFAIK, they just used red oxide paint.
     
  7. tuffer5552

    tuffer5552 Member

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    At Bodmin we have had several saddle tanks made from stainless steel. Only on the little engines, the small industrials, Alfred and Judy, because the tanks are far too small for anybody to get into paint a lining layer.
     
  8. tuffer5552

    tuffer5552 Member

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    Also, I dont like getting in tanks anymore after my near miss. I was leaning into the tank on a GWR tank and dropped the spanner, I could see it so I reached in to get it, I couldnt quite reach so I squeezed in a little further! Got the spanner but then realised I was stuck fast around the waist in the filler neck. Vertical, head straight down, legs waving around in the air. Luckily two colleagues were close at hand and saw and heard my predicament and came to my aid. They grabbed a leg each and pulled me out. After much laughter and ribbing I recognised quite how stupid I was!!
     
  9. Pannier Man

    Pannier Man Member

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    We used Bitumen and It'll be re-painted every year or so.It was also painted inside the bunker and as it never fully dries, it doesn't chip off when coal is dropped in, or crack as the panniers flex.
     
  10. Martin Perry

    Martin Perry Nat Pres stalwart Staff Member Moderator

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    Have you had any issues with cracking?
     

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