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Trespassers spoiling it for the rest of us!

Discussion in 'What's Going On' started by Swiss Toni, Jul 12, 2014.

  1. Swiss Toni

    Swiss Toni Well-Known Member

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    This really gets my goat!!!
    8635.jpg 8636.jpg
     
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  2. Footbridge

    Footbridge Member

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    I've seen a Zebra crossing ;)

    Thinking further, I've always wondered where there is a live 3rd rail is the railway scattered with electrocuted Badgers, Rabbits and Deer? Is the voltage between the 3rd rail and earth or just between the 3rd rail and the other two?
     
  3. Wenlock

    Wenlock Well-Known Member Friend

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    AFAIK on Southern Region system the potential is between 3rd rail and earth, (with running rails bonded for a good earth return?)

    But on the London Underground 4 rail system the voltage is between outer/3rd rail (positive) and centre / 4th rail (negative) with the positive about 440 volts +ve and the negative about 220 volts -ve, but can vary.

    On the Southern there used to be a few dead dogs which had got a "belt" from the live rail and turned to bite it.
     
  4. RalphW

    RalphW Resident of Nat Pres Staff Member Administrator Friend

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    Is rail kill in the same catogory as road kill, anway leg of goat would make a change for Sunday lunch.
     
  5. Spamcan81

    Spamcan81 Nat Pres stalwart

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    The light coloured one looks a bit horny.
     
  6. richards

    richards Well-Known Member

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    It's just another example of the nanny state.
     
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  7. henrywinskill

    henrywinskill Part of the furniture

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    I have to agree with our Swiss friend on this one,definetly trespassers

    In the law of tort, property, and criminal law a trespasser is a person or Goat who commits the act of trespassing on a property, that is, without the permission of the owner. Being present on land as a trespasser thereto creates liability in the trespasser, so long as the trespass is intentional. At the same time, the status of a visitor as a trespasser (as opposed to an invitee or a licensee) defines the legal rights of the visitor if they are injured due to the negligence of the property owner.
     
  8. free2grice

    free2grice Well-Known Member Friend

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  9. MarkinDurham

    MarkinDurham Member

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  10. Steve B

    Steve B Well-Known Member

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    How long can we milk this one for?...
     
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  11. Wayne

    Wayne Member

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    Not so much rabbits, plenty of deer but they are usually hit by trains.
    However loads of electrocuted Badgers! and a few foxes.
     
  12. RalphW

    RalphW Resident of Nat Pres Staff Member Administrator Friend

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    Well if we keep churning them out we could end up with butter, or if we let it ferment a bit, it will get really cheesy.


    I'll get my coat.
     
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  13. Steve B

    Steve B Well-Known Member

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    Might have to butt a few heads together soon...
     
  14. NeilL

    NeilL Well-Known Member

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    A few bright sparks in this thread
     
  15. Spitfire

    Spitfire New Member

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    Yes, it's certainly separating the sheep from the goats!
     
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  16. Bulleid Pacific

    Bulleid Pacific Member

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    I bet one of them's nicknamed Billy. Probably looking for £5 notes to chew before heading off to Salzburg for a supporting role in THAT song from The Sound of Music.
     
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  17. richards

    richards Well-Known Member

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    You're kidding, right? That's not what I herd. The bad puns in this thread are really beginning to get my .....
     
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  18. bob.meanley

    bob.meanley Member

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    I recall going down the line between Eastleigh and Fareham on our 47 during a charter to Portsmouth a few years ago and counting over a dozen ready cooked badgers lying around the railway. Seems to indicate that badgers are not insulated!

    Bob
     
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  19. Shaggy

    Shaggy Well-Known Member

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    I saw a poster once in a signalbox. The picture was a badger and the caption was, "The New Short Circuiting Bar".

    Badgers (or should I say, their burnt remains) can very often be seen under a con rail. We are often called out to remove a "smoking badger" from the line. Has no-one told them smoking on NR Property has been outlawed?

    And yes; They stink!!!
     
  20. KentYeti

    KentYeti Guest

    Goat curry

    By John Torode
    Magazine subscription – 3 issues for £3
    Cooking time
    Prep: 25 mins Cook: 3 hrs
    Skill level
    Moderately easy
    Servings
    Serves 4
    Cheap cuts like goat and mutton require slow-cooking in strong spices to tenderise - this Jamaican classic is a taste sensation

    Ingredients

    Steam coal smoked goat is the best, but other types of goat will do.

    • 1 large onion, roughly chopped
    • 10 garlic cloves
    • 100g ginger, chopped
    • 100ml vegetable oil
    • 2 scotch bonnet chillies, chopped
    • small handful curry leaves
    • 3 thyme sprigs
    • 4 tbsp mild curry powder
    • 700g mutton or goat shoulder, diced
    • 400g can chopped tomatoes
    • 300ml lamb or beef stock
    • 410g can pinto, kidney or black-eyed beans
    • juice ½ lemon
    • small bunch coriander, chopped
    • warmed roti (Jamaican flatbread ) and rice, to serve
    Method
    1. Place the onion, garlic and ginger in a food processor and blend to a purée. Heat the oil in a large flameproof casserole dish, add the onion mixture and cook for 5 mins until softened. Add the chillies, curry leaves, thyme, curry powder and 2 tsp salt. Cook for 2-3 mins until fragrant.
    2. Tip the mutton or goat into the pan. Cook for 5 mins over a medium-high heat until the meat has browned. Add the chopped tomatoes and stock. Increase the heat, bring to the boil and cook for 10 mins. Reduce heat, cover and leave to simmer gently for 2½ hrs – remove the lid for the final 30 mins of cooking.
    3. Add the beans to heat through, plus more chilli if you want it spicier. After 5 mins more, remove from the heat. Add the lemon juice and coriander, and stir well. Serve with warmed roti and rice.
    Recipe from Good Food magazine, August 2012

    With very grateful thanks to the BBC, http://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/2369636/goat-curry
     

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