If you register, you can do a lot more. And become an active part of our growing community. You'll have access to hidden forums, and enjoy the ability of replying and starting conversations.

Brake testing.

Discussion in 'Locomotive M.I.C.' started by Eightpot, Mar 24, 2018.

  1. Eightpot

    Eightpot Part of the furniture

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2006
    Messages:
    5,958
    Likes Received:
    932
    Location:
    Aylesbury
    I presume that a brake test to ensure continuity throughout the length of a train is still carried on loco hauled passenger trains with the Guard at the back of the train to ensure this. However, where freight trains are involved with no Guard at the back, is it not done, or is there a different method involved?
     
  2. Romsey

    Romsey Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2007
    Messages:
    1,793
    Likes Received:
    423
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Retired SPM
    Location:
    Close to Spike Island
    Heritage Railway Volunteer:
    Yes I am an active volunteer
    Someone has to walk to the rear of the train and open the brake valve to apply the brake and hear the air pressure escape. It's part of the procedures in a yard or terminal whenever a train is formed or the train formation altered.
    It is a good few years since I have done such things, but for trains that have been stabled in sidings or on site for engineering works, checking the brakes applied using the loco brake valve was sufficient. It is probably different nowadays.

    For further details search for RSSB Rule book GERM8000 section TW1 part 4.
    Also the working manual for rail staff - white pages covers train preparation.
    Enjoy your late evening reading.

    Cheers, Neil
     
  3. threelinkdave

    threelinkdave Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2013
    Messages:
    2,011
    Likes Received:
    1,149
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Retired
    Location:
    Stratford-upon-Avon or in a brake KD to BH
    Heritage Railway Volunteer:
    Yes I am an active volunteer
    Just a warning to anyone not an experienced railwayman. When doing the test you need to hold the pipe firmly to stop it kicking back. If you just open the cock the air pipe will fly about like a demented snake
     
  4. Romsey

    Romsey Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2007
    Messages:
    1,793
    Likes Received:
    423
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Retired SPM
    Location:
    Close to Spike Island
    Heritage Railway Volunteer:
    Yes I am an active volunteer
    Thank you for mentioning that safety aspect.
    I was taught to hold the end of the hose near the connector and open the brake cock slowly.

    ( But that was on Freightliner flats where the brake cocks were used every day and were reasonably smooth to operate.)

    Cheers, Neil
     
    Wenlock likes this.
  5. LMS2968

    LMS2968 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2006
    Messages:
    2,071
    Likes Received:
    1,932
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Lecturer retired: Archivist of Stanier Mogul Fund
    Location:
    Wigan
    Heritage Railway Volunteer:
    Yes I am an active volunteer
    I remember this happened to a guard at Arpley in the 1970s. It was a long time before he could walk again. It was an awful lot longer before he could perform certain other activities, though.
     
    fish7373 and Wenlock like this.

Share This Page