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Bronze casting from 3d model

Discussion in 'Steam Traction' started by Stuart Harrod, Jan 30, 2018.

  1. Stuart Harrod

    Stuart Harrod New Member

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    Hi everyone,

    I am currently in the middle of a project to re-create a long lost bronze plate denoting pressure and the build number of a Henschel locomotive boiler. The file has been 3d printed and approved for production.

    My question becomes as such;
    What are good bronze foundries in the UK currently and how easily can they work from a 3d cad file? Can they burn out the printed model or does a wax/wood model need to be made?

    Thanks,
    Stuart Harrod
     

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  2. 32110

    32110 Member

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    We had a small item cast in brass using lost wax process. The wax pattern was created from a 3D file. Do you want me to ask about our contact?
     
  3. ilvaporista

    ilvaporista Part of the furniture

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  4. Eightpot

    Eightpot Part of the furniture

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    From a former neighbour who ran a non-ferrous foundry gunmetal, (a type of bronze, agreed), is the metal to use. Brass should be avoided particularly in 'thin' castings like plates as one has to have the molten metal hotter to get it to flow through the mould, and it can then burn the zinc content out making a porous result.
     
  5. 30854

    30854 Part of the furniture

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    Aaah ..... this must explain what looks like pitting on certain 19th century name and numberplates, when seen close up.
     

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