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Bulleid Pacifics - Past or Present

Discussion in 'Steam Traction' started by 34007, May 13, 2008.

  1. Jamessquared

    Jamessquared Nat Pres stalwart

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    Not sure if we are at cross purposes. The tender sides had a carriage profile, but the loco obviously didn't, for the reasons you say. That straight away would make washing with carriage washing plant problematic, as seems to be alluded to in the comment from @Monkey Magic above that when it was tried at Clapham Junction, "apparently they were not cleaned right to the top of the sides". Probably not surprising since the carriage washing brushes wouldn't have reached if the sides of the loco were sloped in!

    My hunch is that the locos being designed to use carriage washing plant is probably a fallacy. Rather, I suspect that they were designed to be easy to wash with portable, hand-held jet washers - which were in use for loco cleaning by the early 1940s - but coupled with the carriage profile of the tender, that has become confused to become what I suspect is an urban myth that they were designed to go through carriage washing plants.

    Incidentally - the jet washers were apparently referred to as "Jennies". They comprised a small paraffin engine and pump on a trolley, that directed a jet of steam and dilute acid through a hose and nozzle to where it was required. Apparently they could clean in ten minutes what took ten hours to do by hand. From the photos I've seen, they would be eminently well adapted to cleaning the sides of a Bulleid pacific.

    Tom
     
  2. MellishR

    MellishR Part of the furniture Friend

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    Which of Tom's reasons do you say doesn't support his argument?
     
  3. Spamcan81

    Spamcan81 Nat Pres stalwart

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    It was the profile of the tender not the loco that matched the profile of the carriages.
     
  4. Flying Phil

    Flying Phil New Member

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    I think we are all actually in agreement - In theory they could have gone through a type of carriage washer - but never did. They were easier and faster to clean with power hoses and long handled brushes than conventional boiler cladding. They looked sleek and modern which the SR management liked, and one of the reasons why they had appointed OVS was to modernise the steam fleet. It was a convenient justification during war time conditions.
     
  5. Steve

    Steve Resident of Nat Pres Friend

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    No. 3. I got the impression that Tom was suggesting that the fact that the loco was not built to carriage profile was a point to support his argument. Perhaps I was wrong, having reread the post.
     

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