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Cheap oak?

Discussion in 'Carriage & Wagon M.I.C.' started by Graham Phillips, Mar 19, 2018.

  1. Graham Phillips

    Graham Phillips New Member

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    A truck mechanic's life is the life for me.
    Location:
    About half way between Bewdley & Arley on the SVR
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    Yes I am an active volunteer
    I'm not directly involved with purchasing materials for the SVR Wagon Department, so I'm not really sure how much we pay for the iroko and keruing we buy, but these new oak "sleepers" (actually 8"x4"x8') look reasonably cheap to me at £25 each.
    They've got new unspecified hardwood or chestnut or slightly larger second hand oak at £20 as well.
    I doubt the new ones are seasoned, and the second hand ones do look like genuine creosoted sleepers, so I suppose we'd be better off with the new ones and store them somewhere dry and ventilated for a year or so first. They're not too far away, so I could take a trip over there and have a look at them.
    Has anyone got any experience with them? Is that a good price? Are they any good for joinery; wagon door frames, brake van running boards and the like?
     
  2. StoneRoad

    StoneRoad Member

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    Occupation:
    Restoration of heritage items, mainly in timber.
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    Haltwhistle
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    Yes I am an active volunteer
    Naturally seasoning oak takes approximately one year per inch of thickness.
    During the process even thick baulks can twist, warp and shake ...
    We used green oak for the Bowes waggon underframes (all three of them).
    .
    If you do go and look at them, perhaps teaching you egg sucking here, but check all sides / edges and look for areas of knots (confused grain pattern) or other damage.
    It does seem like a good price, although they are so close to you that transport costs would not be too much.
     
    Sawdust and Graham Phillips like this.

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