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New website locomotive no.376

Discussion in 'Links' started by 240P15, Apr 13, 2018.

  1. 240P15

    240P15 Member

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    Last edited: Apr 14, 2018
    huochemi, Miff, 3855 and 1 other person like this.
  2. 30854

    30854 Part of the furniture

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    I'd reckon these little NSB moguls are an ideal light railway loco (almost a more modern 'Ilfracombe Goods') and they would likely have been high on Col. Stephens' shopping list, had their been a Norwegian reserve as a source of stock back in his day. The first time I was aware of their existence was during 'King Haakon VII's' stint with the Main Line Steam Trust.
     
  3. John Baritone

    John Baritone New Member

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    @30854: As I understand it, the design of No.19 was based on a Scottish design (HR, I think?).

    The Norwegians realised that they had the same problems as railways in the North of Scotland; fairly small amounts of freight, low passenger numbers, and long distances between stations - mostly in small towns and villages - and not much in the way of capital to build the lines. So they figured that the same design of engine would suit them; light overall weight and low axle-loading would minimise the demands (and costs) on the trackbed and bridges; a leading bogie would steady the engine climbing banks, minimising side to side nosing, so reducing the demands on P-way gangs; superheating, high boiler pressure and free-breathing valve gear would minimise coal consumption; and external cylinders and valve gear would make it easy for crews to check and oil part way through a long trip without needing access to a pit.

    They did make some additions, making allowance for the engines working up inside the Arctic Circle; a full tender cab; a steam turbine generator which powered not only the massive headlamp, but also 37 different working and inspections lights dotted about; and - sheer bliss on bleak winter workings - side windows with mirror surfaces, which hinged out, giving you a windbreak when leaning out and looking forward, and which acted as rear view mirrors to keep an eye on the train behind you when pulling out of stations!
    :)

    And then, the next firing turn, you'd be back on a Bucket . . . :(
     

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