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[Photoplug] Invicta and 'John Bull'

Discussion in 'Steam Traction' started by wcmlbls1846, Jun 21, 2017.

  1. wcmlbls1846

    wcmlbls1846 Active Member

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    These are locos built in Newcastle in 1830 and 1831 by Robert Stephenson & Co. Although built within 12 months of each other, they are very different. Invicta has sloping cylinders attached to the boiler like Rocket; 'John Bull' has inside cylinders under the smokebox.

    Invicta was built for the Canterbury & Whitstable Rly, and is now preserved in Canterbury heritage museum:

    https://andrewstransport.smugmug.com/BritishheritagerailwaysA/Canterbury-heritage-museum-Kent/

    'John Bull' was built for the Camden & Amboy Rly in New Jersey. Its nickname reflects its English antecedents. It is now preserved in the Smithsonian National Museum of American History in Washington DC, along with an 1876 narrow gauge 4-4-0 and a 1926 Southern Railway 4-6-2 (which was shrouded in plastic because of building work). The Pennsylvania Railway built a working replica of 'John Bull' in 1940. It is now preserved in the Railroad Museum of Pennsylvania. Photos of all these are here:

    https://andrewstransport.smugmug.co...hsonian-National-Museum-of-American/i-B8tHPPV

    Cheers

    Andrew N
     
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  2. Johann Marsbar

    Johann Marsbar New Member

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    The 1939 built John Bull at the Strasburg museum has slightly less clutter around it than the original at the Smithsonian..

    10-1210.jpg

    It does have the later style "tender" rather than the Washington version which has the more "original" version.

    In addition, there is a 1933 built replica of the Stourbridge Lion in the local museum at Honesdale, PA, but it is rather difficult to photograph with various other exhibits around it. This is the best I could do when I visited the place a few years back...

    11-2945.jpg
     
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