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Socialising after a day of volunteering

Discussion in 'Heritage Railways & Centres in the UK' started by Mike Delamar, Nov 22, 2010.

  1. jtx

    jtx Member

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    Clearly, you only read and understood part of the last line of my post. The bit about reading and abiding by the rules seems to have passed you by. I do know what the alcohol policy is and it does not back up your "professional" knowledge. It does, however, confirm what I and 60017 have written, ie. it complies with the TWA.

    Incidentally, we can both claim "professional" knowledge from our careers; I note you still don't mention yours.

    I am not advocating arriving on duty the worse for wear, or drinking on duty, however, "within the prescribed limit," is not zero, so don't try and claim it is.

    If you are unfortunate enough to be involved in an accident, the rules are the same as for a car driver. If you're under the limit, you're under the limit. End of story.
     
  2. Lewisb06

    Lewisb06 New Member

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    OK....To put this to bed.....

    The drive limit on the roads is:
    * 80 milligrammes (mg) of alcohol per 100 millilitres (ml) of blood (80mg/100ml), or
    * 35 microgrammes of alcohol per 100ml of breath, or
    * 107mg of alcohol per 100ml of urine

    If I registered just below the above whilst driving a car you would be ok.....maybe a squeaky bum time but I would be free to go.
    If I registered the same whilst on railway duty the sh1t would hit the fan.
    I would be sacked. No questions.
     
  3. Ian1210

    Ian1210 New Member

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    Indeed - but of course we all know how these things happen - the "Railway" has to abide, but the "individual" is not quite the same thing! Also, it actually does depend on the operating railway's rules as to what the limit is, NOT the TWA. TWA only sets the maximum blood level of alcohol and a railway is quite at liberty to set a lower [or even none at all] level if it so wishes, and some railways, especially those inter-operating with NR, actually do this.

    As everyone has said, it's all a matter of interpretation and, in the end, common sense. For my part, I would not wish to drink for at least 8 hours prior to taking up any safety critical duty to ensure that I was clear of the stuff.
     
  4. 60017

    60017 Part of the furniture Friend

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    TWA sets the limit for criminal prosecution. Anything less declared by an operator can only be dealt with by internal discipline.
     
  5. 60017

    60017 Part of the furniture Friend

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    Do any Heritage Railways actually perform random alcohol screening for those performing safety critical roles?
     
  6. Edward

    Edward New Member

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    NYMR does so regularly.

    This is actually stricter than the mainline TOC's I have driven for, as alcohol testing is only carried out after incidents, or on a "for cause" basis, ie you turn up for work smelling of it. Drug testing is carried out on a random basis, usually with 24 hours notice (which is too short a time for most things to have left your system).

    Going back to the start of this thread, was I the only person who thought "journalist fishing for quotes?"
     
  7. Gwenllian2001

    Gwenllian2001 New Member

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    Well judging by the poor standard of literacy displayed, he or she cannot be taken seriously as a journalist. Having said that, the original query was about after-work socialising not about getting drunk. I'm not sure why people associate social drinking with anti-social behaviour. Sadly, many young people seem to think that it's not worth going for a drink if they can remember anything about it the next morning. That sort of behaviour will continue and all the warnings and smugly produced figures regarding permissible levels matter not a jot. People either behave responsibly or they do not.

    If you wish to see after work socialising in action, try the Ffestiniog which has its own multi prize winning pub, open to all and a very young, in railway terms, group of volunteers. There you will see responsible drinking in a good social setting. It beats sitting on a park bench slurping cheap cider.

    Meic
     
  8. Mike Delamar

    Mike Delamar New Member

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    Im certainly not a journalist fishing for quotes.

    Ive been a railway enthusiast all my life. mainly historical research and building of finescale models.

    I started the thread in a light hearted manner mainly to gauge what the environment of becoming a preseved railway volunteer would be.

    I wanted to know weather it would be all work and no play, after all, if your asking someone to work hard all day for free, I for one would like to relax and socialise with fellow volunteers afterward.

    I cant volunteer at the moment, location, family and job wouldnt allow, however that can always change, but would I now if this is the sort of attitude to expect?

    I wanted to know if id be surrounded by gents or anoraks, I think Ive made my mind up.

    Mike
     
  9. tobes3803

    tobes3803 New Member

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    I wouldnt judge your opinion on here as half the people on here probably are anoraks and a large number are either kids or people that dont work on a railway! Your best bet is to take the plunge and volunteer youl soon make freinds and start socializing.
     
  10. 60017

    60017 Part of the furniture Friend

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    I would echo that completely. I've been a volunteer at three sites (on and off since 1968) and made some good friends at all of them. The social aspects often involve a couple in the bar at close of traffic, but it doesn't all revolve around beer!
     
  11. M59137

    M59137 Well-Known Member

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    Sadly, the number of opinions and "faces" that you see on the internet (be it good or bad) is far far greater than the number you will experience actually grafting on a project at the weekend!

    I would agree with the two posts above mine in that there is no substitute for actually giving it a go! Whilst we all enjoy some of these debates (we wouldn't be here otherwise) they are a different world from "real" preservation :)
     
  12. Mike Delamar

    Mike Delamar New Member

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    thanks chaps

    id love to become a volunteer somewhere soon, ive always liked the mechanical side, my dad is a vehicle mechanic and I used to work for him, I also used to restore classic cars.
    I also like the idea of working on the pw side too.

    as I say, circumstances at the moment it wouldnt be possible, my job is a Liverpool taxi driver so I have to work lots of hours and weekends too, I get time on the internet when im sat round in the cab.

    I was fascinated by the lady on the documentary, I thought she was fantastic,I wish my girlfreind was the type who likes to get her hands dirty, too concerned with hair and nails being clean.
    If the stories about her being let go for her comments are true Im very sorry to hear that.


    "Well judging by the poor standard of literacy displayed, he or she cannot be taken seriously as a journalist"

    as I say, Im not a journalist, but Im not a female, my username is my real name, Michael.
    Im not afraid to hide behind a username, I may have poor standards of literacy, but I like to think I have a bit of common sense.

    after all, Im not sure how many female Mike's you know?

    Mike
     
  13. lil Bear

    lil Bear Well-Known Member

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    At Llan there is a number of us (around a dozen maybe) who book onto various railtours throughout the year and do something away from the rly. There has been groups of us gone up the Lickey, over Shap, the S&C etc and we normally do the Cambrian each year too. We've also done nights out in Brum and Liverpool plus the odd day trip to other events at various railways. Then there are also some who have arranged trips abroad to sample steam in other countrys like Germany and Poland plus others, though having never gone on one of these trips myself I can't give great details.

    So there is a social side that does not revolve around alcohol (though we are prone to the odd drink!).
     
  14. Gwenllian2001

    Gwenllian2001 New Member

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    Oddly enough, it may seem, but my comment was not meant as a direct insult. I just found it surprising that someone might have thought that you were a journalist fishing for quotes. I'm sure that you have plenty of common sense and that you would be welcome at Porthmadog; it's not all that far from you.

    Incidentally, I know two female 'Mikes'. One is a Michaela and the other is actually Michael.

    Meic
     
  15. Mike Delamar

    Mike Delamar New Member

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    Ok Meic, no worries.
    my reply could have been a bit better so I apologise, I wasnt offended, was just me being a bit cheeky I guess. Im not a hot head :)

    words on a forum sometimes dont come across in the mood that is meant

    take care

    Mike




     
  16. northernsteam

    northernsteam New Member

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    This is a fascinating discussion folk.
    I am sure that no-one who goes socialising after a hard days graft on the railway will have a few beers and then jump in their car and drive home will they?
    Long gone are the days of weak thirst quenching beer which enabled the body fluid levels to be restored after several hours hard manual labour.
    If you're handling an engine with several hundred or so paying customers relying on you to keep them safe then there is only one message, don't drink beforehand!
    I rather gather that none of the railways permit it now anyway, or will someone own up that theirs does!
     
  17. Ann Clark

    Ann Clark New Member

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    Where to start. Socializing as the original poster said does not need to be alcohol. I am known for the odd occasion where I drink lime and soda. Next units of alcohol. It takes the average male 2 hours to process the first unit of alcohol had 1 hour for each subsequent unit. However please remember when I first learned to drive a pint was 2 units and now it is more likely to be 2.5 or 3 for ordinary beer. Those of you who drink strong larger will be drinking more per pint and the cider drinkers really need to check as some can be closer to 4 units per pint.

    All I will say is that both the railways that I volunteer on doe socialize especially at galas and normally in a public house but moderation is the name of the game.
     
  18. olly5764

    olly5764 Member

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    If you have an operational duty you have to be carefull what you do the night previous, however, the social side of preserved railway work is all important, while it is working with railways, locos, coaches etc that attracts us, it is often the people that keep us there.
     

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