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Talyllyn Loading Gauge?

Discussion in 'Narrow Gauge Railways' started by BigBoyFan4006, Jan 22, 2015.

  1. BigBoyFan4006

    BigBoyFan4006 New Member

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    Does the Talyllyn Railway even have an official loading gauge? If not, what's their tallest and widest piece of rail equipment (if anyone knows)?
     
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  2. talyllyn1

    talyllyn1 New Member

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    TR loading gauge (as represented by the standard bogie carriages) is 5ft 8ins width x 8ft 3ins high.

    Vehicles that exceed this:-
    Glyn Valley coaches - 5ft 10ins x 8ft 4ins. high. The short length of these vehicles means that the eaves do not come into conflict with bridge arches on curves.
    Loco No 6 Douglas - 8ft 8 3/4 ins high. Track under some of the bridges lowered to accommodate this when purchased in the 1953. Narrow width of 5ft 4 ins allows clearance at eaves of cab under bridge arches.
    Coach width dimensions exclude door handles.

    Not sure why you say "even have a loading gauge"? Without one, out of gauge vehicles would not get beyond the Wharf road bridge!
     
  3. BigBoyFan4006

    BigBoyFan4006 New Member

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    I'm well aware of the importance of having a loading gauge. The reason I said "even have a loading gauge" is because I didn't know if the Talyllyn Railway had a "defined" loading gauge or if they went with whatever happened to fit. (Looking back, I probably should have said this beforehand.)

    Thanks for the info!
     
  4. Reading General

    Reading General Well-Known Member

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    the TR loading gauge was surely determined by the Inspector allowing it to open in the first place with the track slewed and the door handles removed from one side of the coaches.
     
  5. talyllyn1

    talyllyn1 New Member

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    That is undoubtedly true, although the actual figures might have got "lost" in the chaotic files in Haydn Jones' office. It's perhaps worth mentioning that although the Inspector's instructions to lock the non-platform side carriage doors and remove the handles was carried out, the track under the arched bridges remains dead-centre to this day!
    There would have been some movement of large equipment up to the quarries during the McConnel period, but the modest level of traffic in the Haydn Jones era meant that the only potentially out-of gauge loads would be the rare movement of a tree trunk or a stack of hay on a slate wagon - both undoubtedly dealt with appropriately at each bridge! Pre-preservation, the railway never felt the need to acquire any new rolling stock.
    The arrival of No 6 Douglas certainly concentrated the minds of the preservationists, as the loco was found to be too tall to pass under Hendy bridge. Measurements taken of all of the other bridges revealed that clearances were too tight at Cynfal as well. The track was lowered at both bridges, but the track-bed at Hendy was solid rock and it took several attempts in the 1950's and 60's to remedy this. There was a 5 mph speed restriction for No 6 at this location until adequate clearance was obtained.
    The new standard bogie coaches and loco No 7 Tom Rolt were built to the established maximum TR loading gauge of 5ft 8ins W x 8ft 3ins H. Although loco No 6 and the GVT coaches exceed this it's unlikely that any future additions would be allowed to.
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2015
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  6. michaelh

    michaelh Well-Known Member

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    There wasn't much large equipment in the quarry - slate saws and water driven compressors were about the limit of the mechanisation. The plant in the mills was all driven by belting which in turn was driven by water wheels. Said water wheels would have been assembled in situ.
     
  7. Steve

    Steve Part of the furniture Friend

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    Talking of out of gauge loads, when I brought the hopper from Quarry siding back to Pendre on the Bowflat it didn't quite fit under one of the arch bridges (I can't remember which one after all this time) despite 'Sir's' measurements saying it would. We couldn't move it over far enough to get the high point under the centre of the arch, which hadn't been allowed for. It got nicely stuck and was only freed with a lot of effort. There was a nice groove in the arch afterwards; probably well covered in soot by now.
    Happy, fun, days.
     
  8. VolunteerCoord

    VolunteerCoord New Member

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    The Talyllyn does have a loading gauge, there is an official drawing, which shows the clearances to structures, and the desirable kinematic envelope for vehicles, as well as the loading gauge. Tallest vehicles are the self propelled flail mower and loco 6.
     
  9. Marquis DeCarabas

    Marquis DeCarabas New Member

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    What chaotic files in Haydn Jones' office? Remember Edward Thomas and not Daniel & Sons?
     
  10. D1039

    D1039 Member

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    Thread resurrection alert!

    What is the maximum coach length, can anyone advise please? (I paced it at 12 paces, so something around 36'?)

    Thanks
     
  11. lostlogin

    lostlogin New Member

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    Per an old general appendix I have carriage 18 is 33'
     
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  12. michaelh

    michaelh Well-Known Member

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    18 is slightly longer than the Tisdales
     

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