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Tracking down a Beames (LNWR) LMS 380 Class 0-8-4T

Discussion in 'Steam Traction' started by Wayland, Feb 9, 2018.

  1. pmh_74

    pmh_74 Active Member

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    Thanks, no firm dates yet but my brother has confirmed that they were Joseph Lowther Holmes, who apparently "was around in the 1890s", and Alfred James Edwards, who I believe started work in the late days of the LNWR (my Grandmother, his daughter, was born in 1921 and Alfred died in the late 1970s, so at a guess born 1895 give or take a few years)

    Apologies for ongoing vagueness, my brother has all the family tree details but I think his email was from memory without having checked yet. :)
     
  2. paullad1984

    paullad1984 Active Member

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    I find this sll fascinating. My great grandfather worked as a guard out of Kirkby Stephen for the NER.
     
  3. Monkey Magic

    Monkey Magic Active Member

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    Just as a suggestion - given their ages it is highly likely that they would be called up during WW1. If you could find their service records it might shine a light (lack of records may indicate that they were not called up due to their profession). It may include next of kin information, I seem to recall that some list physical features like tattoos etc.

    Apologies if I am suggesting things you've already done.

    Something else I wonder is what happened to their company staff records. For example if you read Railways Archive the accident reports will say 'Driver X has a clean record bar...' so progression, disciplinary issues etc will have been recorded. Would it be worth having a look at the PRO?

    http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/help-with-your-research/research-guides/railway-workers/
     
  4. pmh_74

    pmh_74 Active Member

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    Hi, yes it would, I haven’t really got around to this and haven’t time presently, I merely wondered if your LNWR research had thrown up any interesting records. I’m not aware of either of them serving in WW1 (and suspect JL Holmes would have been too old) but could be wrong. There was another uncle on my Dad’s side who did serve in WW1, we have his portrait in uniform somewhere. These were the only two railwaymen I know of though.
     
  5. 30854

    30854 Part of the furniture

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    I remember being informed (during one or other of the Cold War scares) that the upper limit on 'call up' age at that time was 40. I've no notion of such limits on service during WWI but coincidentally, while this thread has been active, I happened across my maternal grandfather's "Certificate of Transfer to Reserve on Demobilization" (Army Form Z.21), issued 9 Feb 1919. In pre-computer days, three months from cessation of hostilities to demob was pretty good going, considering how many were in uniform by the end of the "war to end all wars". Born in 1881, he enlisted up on Aug 29th 1914, making him 33 on volunteering and 37 on demobilization.

    I was, of course, utterly failing to locate something completely different at the time!
     
  6. Monkey Magic

    Monkey Magic Active Member

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    Although it is quite old J.A.B.Hamilton is quite good on the different experiences of railwaymen called up. A lot depended on when you joined up, if you joined early then you tended to be stuck in the infantry, (skills not being appreciated by the military) later on they came to realise that there was a shortage of skilled railwaymen at the front so if you called up later with critical skills you would perhaps get a safer railway posting. (I don't know how true this is).

    I'm afraid that while I do a fair amount of archive work this isn't my area of specialisation and haven't looked at the material but the PRO is very user friendly as archives go. As the NUR archives are at Warwick they should also be accessible as well. York might also be worth checking out if you are so inclined.
     

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